Episode 126 – Treadmill, Jayke B

Hi folks! We are starting this week with a discussion about some recent changes to Ursula’s Routine, and a (brief) talk about her writing methods. We wrap up this week’s interview with Jayke B about how they stay productive!

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3 Replies to “Episode 126 – Treadmill, Jayke B”

  1. Hey, I normally listen to the whole episode before commenting I needed to jump in with a warning. You should absolutely pay your bills with paper checks. I have had multiple instances of companies (mostly hospitals but also insurance companies and the giant monopoly that controls my state’s electrical grid) denying that I’ve paid them and electronic transaction IDs do no legally constitute proof of payment. The only thing that constitutes legal proof of payment is a copy of a physical check from the bank with the signature on the back. Hospitals are the absolute worst about this. Please spare yourself the years of grief and thousands of dollars and make sure you pay via a legally traceable method. Also, you need to make sure you get paper utility bills so you can register to vote. My friend lived in Virginia for well over a decade before he registered to vote because they would only accept utility bills as proof of residence and he had everything set up to auto-deduct straight from his bank account because he has real problems keeping track of bills. He finally managed to make friends with a landlord who signed an affidavit for him, but friendly landlords are few and far between.

  2. Great episode! I’ve been a fan of Wodehouse forever; he was a staple of my dad’s bedtime story reading when we were kids. Good stuff. (Small nit: his name is pronounced “Woodhouse”. 🙂

    I will definitely be interested to hear more about Ursula’s writing process. To stay on theme, Douglas Adams (who knew Wodehouse), wrote this interesting tidbit in the introduction to “The Salmon of Doubt”:

    “When Wodehouse was writing a book, he used to pin the pages in undulating waves around the wall of his workroom. Pages he felt were working well would be pinned up high, and those that still needed work would be lower down the wall. His aim was to get the entire manuscript up to the picture rail before he handed it in.”

    How he managed to write so _many_ brilliant books is still a mystery, but he did keep writing well into his 90s, so I suppose that helps.

  3. (Apologies in advance if this is a duplicate comment…)

    Great episode! Really interesting interview, and I’ll be fascinated to hear more about Ursula’s writing process. I also have a warm spot in my heart for Wodehouse. His books were a staple of my dad’s bedtime reading to my sister and I when we were kids. (Small nit to pick: his name is pronounced “Woodhouse”. 🙂

    To stay more or less on topic, though, Douglas Adams (who knew Wodehouse) had something interesting to say in the introduction to “The Salmon of Doubt”:

    “When Wodehouse was writing a book, he used to pin the pages in undulating waves around the wall of his workroom. Pages he felt were working well would be pinned up high, and those that still needed work would be lower down the wall. His aim was to get the entire manuscript up to the picture rail before he handed it in.”

    No, how he managed to write so _many_ incredibly polished novels remains a mystery, but he worked right up into his 90s, so I guess that helps.

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